Digest for sci.electronics.repair@googlegroups.com - 1 update in 1 topic

thiagosoareskun30@gmail.com: Sep 16 07:03AM -0700


> ___________________________________________________________________________________________________
 
> contact me to : mattosbw1@gmail.com mattosbw1(at)gmail.com
 
> ___________________________________________________________________________________________________
 
Hi, I can you please send me the Solution Manual Electronic Principles (8th Ed., Albert Malvino, David Bates)
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Digest for sci.electronics.repair@googlegroups.com - 8 updates in 3 topics

Rob <nomail@example.com>: Sep 14 05:11PM

> that I complain about. Had I not known that a capacitor should not be
> over $ 25 (their cost) I might have thought $ 200 for a part may be
> reasonable.
 
The point (at least my point) was not what a reasonable cost of a repair
would be, that of course depends on a lot of things not the least of
which is the local standard of living.
 
My point is that with the reasonable cost of some repair being e.g. $50,
there exist companies that make effort to be at the top of search results
for such repairs, and then overcharge by at least 5 times. Often relying
on customers that do not ask first what it will cost, will not shop
around to compare offers, or are in immediate need of help.
And in this scheme, the companies advertising the service are not even
providing it themselves, they are middlemen that only operate a service
to take orders from customers (by telephone, or these days by phone app)
and pass them on to existing people performing the service.
 
Sometimes they even provide some "subscription/insurance" service that
is part of the scam, in that you pay some premium for "guaranteed repair
at no cost" of certain things, then find that your particular repair is
not covered by the scheme.
"Dallas" <Cybnorm@spam_me_not.Hotmail.Com>: Sep 14 07:04PM

Sergey Kubushyn wrote:
 
> The entire AHS is a rip off :)
 
 
Actually, over 28 years with these guys we've made out pretty well...
a couple of new water heaters, a new furnace, a couple of under slab
leaks, total rebuild of the condensers parts (except fan motor) and
much more. But there is no denying they can be a pain in the ass with
"second opinions" and arguments over coverage.
 
 
--
Dallas
"Dallas" <Cybnorm@spam_me_not.Hotmail.Com>: Sep 14 07:16PM

John-Del wrote:
 
> So what happened is that the thief the warranty company sent out to
> look at your AC figured he'd get $750 out of you instead of the $225
> that they would pay him.
 
 
 
Yep, it would have come down differently if I had been here. I would
have told him to get back in his truck and buzz off. A few of AHS's
contractors are actually honest and I would have tried to get one of
those for a "second opinion".
 
--
Dallas
Jeff Liebermann <jeffl@cruzio.com>: Sep 14 08:43PM -0700

On Thu, 12 Sep 2019 20:12:38 -0000 (UTC), "Dallas"
>So, my question is this: Is there anyway possible that dirty coils
>could stop a fan motor from running? (I doubt very much that the motor
>was thermal protected.)
 
The type or maker/model of the A/C would be helpful.
 
The fan motor has another purpose besides blowing air through the
cooling coils.
<https://www.partselect.com/Repair/Air-Conditioner/Unusual-Noise/>
Some air conditioner models use the condenser fan
blade to transfer excess drain water onto the condenser coils;
if the drain port becomes clogged, the excess water can cause
the unusual noise as the fan blades slosh through it. Drain
the excess water and make sure the port is no longer plugged
to clear up this problem.
(...)
The fan motor bearings and/or bushings can become worn
over time and cause the unusual noise. They can also become
worn if the blower wheel is unbalanced, which happens when
there is a buildup of dirt because the air filter has not been
changed. When the fan motor becomes noisy on a window
air conditioner unit, it means it needs to be replaced.
 
Note the comment about the unbalanced fan and dirty filter.
 
If the drain is clogged, the fan will splatter water all over the
insides of the air conditioner causing any unprotected steel to
eventually rust. I personally haven't seen a clogged drain hole ruin
a bearing, but I can see how it might be possible.
 
I didn't see any mention that the air conditioner was making (bearing)
noises. In my limited experiences with motors, they always announce
impending failure through vibration, noises, smoke, and eventually
trip the overload protector. Because, it was not mentioned, I'll
assume that there was no vibration, noise, or smog prior to the motor
"failure". If the fan had been unbalanced by excessive and
unsymmetrical dirt buildup, it certainly would have vibrated and/or
made noises. Because the condenser coils are not moving, some dirt on
the condenser coils is unlikely to cause a motor unbalance. However,
some dirt on the fan might cause an unbalance. If the A/C or motor
had a thermal breaker, it would have tripped long before any
overheating would cause a bearing failure.
 
<https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=air+conditioner+clean+condenser>
 
Do you do this regularly?
"Cleaning Air Conditioner Coils (How To Video)"
<https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4sWHd4n-AuE>
 
If there was no vibration, noise or smoke, my guess(tm) is all that
happened was the A/C tripped an over current breaker. Since it
happened while you were away, I'll further speculate that the
noiseless "failure" was either caused by a change in the way the A/C
was operated by the cat sitter, or a power surge delivered the
electric utility. I'm a little suspicious why it would fail while you
were out of the area.
 
If the repairman specified that dirt on the condenser coils caused a
bearing failure, I suspect he's a crook and should be treated as such.
However, if he indicated that dirt on the fan blades caused the motor
failure, he might be correct. Since there was no mention of
vibration, noise, or smoke, I suspect the former, and a complaint
should be filed with AHS.
 
Also, please note that in California, repair shops are required to
"offer" the old parts to the customer. You might want to ask the
repair guy for the old motor so you could have a motor shop inspect
the bearing. If he balks or provides creative excuses, you will have
a good clue as to his honesty.
 
--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
lisacourtcondos@gmail.com: Sep 15 03:55AM -0700

On Saturday, September 14, 2019 at 11:43:07 PM UTC-4, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
 
> noises. In my limited experiences with motors, they always announce
> impending failure through vibration, noises, smoke, and eventually
> trip the overload protector.
 
I changed the fan motor on my first floor compressor unit last summer and did so about 10 years on the second floor unit - both being 26 years old now. Both would sometimes fail to start. I would go outside and give them a push with a screwdriver threw the top vents and they would run happily and quietly until the next cycle. They are Heil units.
 
http://gomp3.co/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/heil-air-conditioner-units-ac-units-unit-perform-maintenance-on-2-age-for-sale-prices-are-heil-air-conditioning-units-any-good-heil-air-conditioners-ratings.jpg
Jeff Urban <jurb6006@gmail.com>: Sep 14 12:19PM -0700

I'll send you a perfect in every way dollar bill for two bucks.
Arlen Holder <arlen_h0ldr@arlinghlder.edu>: Sep 14 05:01PM

On Thu, 16 Feb 2017 15:36:42 +0000, Whiskers wrote:
 
> nearby') and they are shown as points on the map within a mile or two of
> where I am (in a large busy city). But I'm pretty sure that comes from
> the OpenSignal server not from the phone's own hardware.
 
UPDATE:
 
I know everyone loves OpenSignal but I prefer an app that provides the
EXACT cellular source when, in my case, it's often a femtocell that is
never going to be on ANY Internet database.
 
To that end, see this post today on this topic, if it helps others.
o Galaxy S9 in UK - poor signal?
<https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/comp.mobile.android/0soPAvWzt78>
 
 
On Sat, 14 Sep 2019 16:32:34 +0000 (UTC), Tony Mountifield wrote:
 
> Ah, I could put my wife's SIM in my old phone to compare...
> I do have the OpenSignal app on both.
 
I agree for cellular you need to be connected to the carrier, which is a
drawback - but luckily you have a second SIM card, where the apps I use can
handle two SIM cards (if the phone can handle two SIM cards of course).
 
I wouldn't suggest OpenSignal since it's an Internet lookup database which
uses triangulation (last I checked anyway) ... where I'd use one of the
apps in the references that does NOT need any access to the Internet.
 
I just looked on my phone where I have "Cellular-Z" freeware installed,
which seems to work well to show signal strength in RSSI, RSRP, RSRQ, &
SINR.
<https://i.postimg.cc/W4zhW166/cellular01.jpg>
 
In my case, I test femtocell signal and cellular repeater signals, where my
femtocell would never be in an Internet database.
<https://i.postimg.cc/TPK3jHft/cellular02.jpg>
 
o Cellular-Z, by JerseyHo
<https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=make.more.r2d2.cellular_z>
"Cellular Z is a telecom signal quality and Wifi network info, channel
info software, the main functions are as follows:
1.Dual SIM mobile phone network information (SIM card serving cell, serving
cell signal quality,neighboring cells).
2.Wifi information (connected, nearby Wifi list, Wifi channel 2.5 and 5
GHz).
3. Current location information GPS Satellites
4. Device information (battery, hardware, system).
5.speedtest.
6.Map track,indoor coverage."
Fox's Mercantile <jdangus@att.net>: Sep 14 12:22PM -0500

On 9/14/19 12:01 PM, Arlen Holder wrote:
[ Nothing of any use, as always. ]
 
Go fuck yourself.
 
 
--
"I am a river to my people."
Jeff-1.0
WA6FWi
http:foxsmercantile.com
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Digest for sci.electronics.repair@googlegroups.com - 6 updates in 2 topics

"jfeng@my-deja.com" <jfeng@my-deja.com>: Sep 13 10:05AM -0700

All of these anecdotes remind me of the complaints about TV repair men charging $50 to replace a 25-cent capacitor if you brought it in to the shop, and $100 if he came out to your place. The argument always was that part of the charge was for knowing which part to replace.
Ralph Mowery <rmowery28146@earthlink.net>: Sep 13 01:52PM -0400

In article <5e17ae67-6978-4191-be1e-520bf2f93443@googlegroups.com>,
jfeng@my-deja.com says...
 
> All of these anecdotes remind me of the complaints about TV repair men charging $50 to replace a 25-cent capacitor if you brought it in to the shop, and $100 if he came out to your place. The argument always was that part of the charge was for knowing which part to replace.
 
That is why I had no problem when I was told it would be $ 100 just for
the man to come out. Not for him to add over $ 200 more for a $ 15 part
that took 10 minuits to find and install. I would have allowed him $ 50
for the markup on the part.
 
 
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Mike Coon <gravity@mjcoon.plus.com>: Sep 13 08:00PM +0100

In article <slrnqnnc6e.fgq.nomail@xs9.xs4all.nl>, nomail@example.com
says...
 
> Not only for the capacitor, but also for the TV ADs.

Save money; don't watch!
 
Mike.
Rob <nomail@example.com>: Sep 14 08:19AM

> All of these anecdotes remind me of the complaints about TV repair men charging $50 to replace a 25-cent capacitor if you brought it in to the shop, and $100 if he came out to your place. The argument always was that part of the charge was for knowing which part to replace.
 
I think that one was more like:
- 25c to replace capacitor
- 49.75 to know which one.
 
(not really depending on location)
 
However, that is a different thing. What this discussion is about is
more the charging of $250 for a repair that reasonably would cost $50,
just because of the middlemen involved and their scheme of scamming
people in dispair.
Ralph Mowery <rmowery28146@earthlink.net>: Sep 14 10:17AM -0400

In article <slrnqnp8k0.ksa.nomail@xs9.xs4all.nl>, nomail@example.com
says...
> more the charging of $250 for a repair that reasonably would cost $50,
> just because of the middlemen involved and their scheme of scamming
> people in dispair.
 
Right. I just had some painting done on the house. I told the painter
I did not want an itimized list of what all he used, just how much the
job would cost. I don't care if he bought paint for $ 50 a gallon
because he gets a discount and the list price is $ 70 a gallon.
 
It gets me when I go to the car dealer to have the standard service of
oil change, tires rotated, and a few other things when I get it safety
inspected as required by the state. They list many things even like the
shop towels they wipe their hands with and the disposal fee for the old
oil. I know they have to wipe and wash their hands and get rid of the
old oil. All I need is the bottom line cost, or if they have to do
anything extra like install new wiper blades or light bulbs to pass the
inspection.
 
When I paid the AC man to come out for $ 100 I was expecting that to
cover his trip and other odd things. As it only took him 10 minuits to
find and replace, I feel ripped off getting charged $ 300 for the $ 15
capacitor. I felt like the bill should have been more like $ 150 total.
Now if he had taken a lot of time to find a difficult problem, a higher
charge would be required.
 
In many cased it is not the actual part cost, but the over all charge
that I complain about. Had I not known that a capacitor should not be
over $ 25 (their cost) I might have thought $ 200 for a part may be
reasonable.
 
 
 
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John Robertson <spam@flippers.com>: Sep 13 12:16PM -0700

On 2019/09/12 7:05 a.m., John-Del wrote:
 
> The few that I swapped from donors I used Dow 340 (my favorite heat sink compound). You certainly can use Arctic Silver or other similar compound. I don't think that chip gets particularly hot in any case.
 
> The front window is uncoated glass, and you can use anything on it to clean it.
 
> I'm concerned with the dust though.. Mouser has always been a good supplier but I wonder if the DMD chip you got isn't a used one. Before installing it, look at it under a strong eye loop while slowly rotating it. Any stuck pixels will stand out.
 
The dust blew off...and no stuck pixels.
 
The replacement TI chip worked just fine, and I used thermal paste
instead of a thermal pad. I did check that the chip was under some
compression against the heat sink prior to using the compound, and we
polished the contact face of the heatsink hoping to get a slightly
better heat transfer. I assume (hope) that was a good idea...
 
Ran it last night for five hours...
 
Thanks for the advice!
 
John :-#)#
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